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Seminars, conferences and online resources for psychotherapists
The Self-Disclosure Dilemma
When should therapists reveal information about themselves?

Saturday 5 November 2016


Traditionally, psychotherapy has been premised on the principle that the relationship should be focused entirely on the patientís process. Reasons include the fiduciary responsibility to attend to the other, the importance of protecting the patient's space, and the great value of working with transference projections. Recently, however, this convention has been challenged by the relational premise that there are two subjectivities of equal weight in the relationship, each playing their part in what occurs in the therapy. When heightened, entangled or difficult moments occur - it is suggested - it is the therapist's duty to explore how their own process or personal history has been activated. Is there a therapeutic value in communicating some of that experience to the client?

Somewhere in between these two theoretical poles, self-disclosure is seen as not so much a theoretical choice as inevitable. We are unable to conceal so much about ourselves - age, gender and ethnicity, facial expressions, bodily responses and implicit communications. Furthermore, practical concerns such as the therapist's need for time-off to deal with personal difficulties also raise the question of how much information is optimal to share or should be left to fantasy.

Should there be a tightly held theoretical stance on this? Or should the decision to disclose or withhold be based entirely on each patient's unique needs? We have invited four speakers with varying attitudes to deliberate this fascinating dilemma.


Speakers

Marcus West
Marcus West is a Training Analyst of the Society of Analytical Psychology. He has taught widely in this country and abroad and was joint winner of the Michael Fordham Prize in 2004. He is on the Editorial Board of the Journal of Analytical Psychology and is currently Chair of Psychotherapy Sussex. He is the author of a number of papers, and three books, Feeling, Being and the Sense of Self, Understanding Dreams in Clinical Practice, and Into the Darkest Places - Early Relational Trauma and Borderline States of Mind. He works in private practice in Sussex. More >>

Sue Cowan-Jenssen
Sue Cowan-Jenssen is a psychotherapist who has worked in private practice in London for thirty years. She worked part-time for five years as a senior psychotherapist at the Trauma Unit of Watford General Hospital. She has specialist trainings in working with trauma, serious illness and bereavement and is an accredited EMDR Consultant. She is a founder member of the Relational School and the London Psychotherapy and Trauma Centre. She has written for books, journals and websites. Her writing covers a wide range of issues from how psychotherapy works to understanding the impact of our competitive culture on our sense of self. More >>

John Rowan
Dr John Rowan is an author, counsellor, psychotherapist and clinical supervisor who practices primal integration. He has been supervising since 1978, and is accredited by BACP. He is a Fellow of the BPS, BACP and UKCP. He helped to found the Association of Humanistic Psychology Practitioners. He has written several books: The Transpersonal: Psychotherapy and Counselling (1993), The Reality Game: A Guide to Humanistic Counselling and Therapy (2016), which includes a chapter on supervision, and The Transpersonal (2005). The Therapistís Use of Self, co-written with Michael Jacobs also includes writings on supervision. More >>

Patrick Casement
Patrick Casement obtained his degree at Cambridge University, in anthropology and theology. He then trained to become a social worker, subsequently becoming an analytical psychotherapist and then a psychoanalyst and training analyst with British Psychoanalytical Society. His first book On Learning from the Patient (1985) became an international best seller in the field of psychoanalysis. A later book, Learning from Our Mistakes (2002), was awarded a Gradiva Award in America for its contribution to psychoanalysis. His last book Learning from Life: becoming a psychoanalyst (2006) is partly autobiographical - an unusual step for an analyst but one he felt able to take since retiring. More >>


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Fees

Self-funded: £130 (sold out)
Self-funded x 2: £180 (sold out)
Organisationally-funded: £220 (sold out)

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CPD Hours

Certificates of attendance for 6 hours will be provided at the event
Venue

Tavistock Centre
120 Belsize Lane
London
NW3 5BA
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Schedule

09.30 Registration and coffee
10:00 Start
11:15 Coffee
13:00 Lunch
15:15 Tea
17:00 End
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FULL PROGRAMME >>