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Seminars, conferences and online resources on psychotherapy and human relationships
Live Events Programme




Live Events



Post-Slavery Syndrome: Intergenerational PTSD in the Consulting Room Today
Friday 22 March (eve) + Saturday 23 March - London
With Dr Aileen Alleyne, Robert Downes, Eugene Ellis, Wayne Mertins-Brown, Judy Ryde, Foluke Taylor, Lennox Thomas

This conference is about living and practicing psychotherapy in a society that is deeply damaged by the legacy of the trans-Atlantic slave trade. The discussion is premised on the theory that through the mostly unconscious transmission of intergenerational trauma, affect and narratives, we continue to perpetuate a destructive power disparity between today's black and white communities; that we are locked into histories that we didn't create but which control our thinking and which need to be continually challenged in order for us to grow emotionally as a society.

Healing the Traumatised Self: Overcoming Challenging Moments in Trauma Treatment
Friday 29 and Saturday 30 March 2019 - London
A 2-day study group led by Professor Ruth Lanius

This workshop will discuss treatment challenges frequently encountered in trauma assessment and treatment from a clinical and neurobiological perspective. Practical strategies on how to deal with these difficulties will be outlined throughout the seminar through clinical case examples and role-plays. The importance of the therapeutic alliance and the effect of traumatic re-enactments on the part of both the therapist and the client will be discussed.

Self-Harming Clients in Psychotherapy
Saturday 6 April 2019 - London
With Anna Motz, Jack Nathan and Dr Maggie Turp

This one-day workshop is designed to support psychotherapists in their work with clients or patients who are on the self-harming spectrum, from minor self-injury to suicide. Our panel will elaborate how we can identify self-harming behaviours, the aetiology of self-harm and how to work with those who are actively self-harming during their therapeutic treatment.

The Psychotherapy Supervision Lab
Saturday 6 April 2019 - Dublin
A seminar led by Dr Aisling McMahon, Claire O'Dowda and Kay Ferriter

This day will provide a unique opportunity to discover the extent to which different psychotherapy schools diverge in their theory and technique when we compare them through the lens of live supervision. Our three presenters have been chosen both for their extensive experience as therapists and because they represent different modalities: a humanistic and integrative psychotherapist, a counselling psychologist with a psychoanalytic orientation, and a gestalt psychotherapist.

Using the Self in Psychotherapy: A 2-day study group on the relational approach
Saturday 27 and Sunday 28 April 2019 - Dublin
Led by Dr Aaron Balick

This one-day workshop is designed to support psychotherapists in their work with clients or patients who are on the self-harming spectrum, from minor self-injury to suicide. Our panel will elaborate how we can identify self-harming behaviours, the aetiology of self-harm and how to work with those who are actively self-harming during their therapeutic treatment.

Borderline Bodies
Working with the Right Brain and Affect Regulation in Developmentally Traumatised Patients

Saturday 4 May 2019 - London
A 1-day seminar led by Dr Clara Mucci

This training day will focus on how to work with adults who have experienced protracted interpersonal trauma in childhood and who go on to attack their own body in adolescence or adulthood. Such self-harm could include eating disorders, particularly bulimia; self-cutting or any attack on the body, which for these clients is experienced as the depository of negative introjects and is therefore considered to be an alien self that needs to be abused, controlled, destroyed or reduced in its power, even though such action is destructive to the self.

Eco-Psychotherapy: Therapy with the earth in mind
Saturday 11 May 2019 - London
With Eco-Psychotherapist Mary-Jayne Rust

As the reality of climate change is now sinking into mainstream society, people are beginning to suffer from "climate anxiety" and "climate grief". While many of us declare that we "love nature", we are also part of a system which is poisoning and destroying much of life on earth. This grave reality can trigger strong feelings such as overwhelm, guilt, rage, grief, impotence and fear which clients may bring to sessions in a variety of ways. While climate change has become the focus of concern, it is part of a much bigger story about our dysfunctional relationship with the rest of nature, in which we humans see ourselves as separate from, and superior to, the more-than-human world. Psychotherapy has grown out of this worldview; as an urban profession we see our suffering and healing only in the context of human relationships. Yet, if we listen, we will hear stories of love and loss in our relationships with the land, animals, plants and more. We also continue to struggle with a very ambivalent relationship with ourselves as animals.

The Masks of Masculinity
Exploring the Links Between Male Vulnerability and Violence

Friday 17 May (eve) + Saturday 18 May 2019 - London
With speakers Rotimi Akinsete, Michael Boyle, Professor Stephen Briggs, Dr Mick Collins, Tamsin Cottis, Nick Duffell, Anthony Howell and Tim Foskett.

An astonishing 13 British men each day take their own lives, and 90 per cent of all violent crimes are perpetrated by men. How can we make sense of these statistics and what do they mean for our society? Men and women are realising there is a problem with masculinity. This conference will address how we can expand our psychological understanding of masculinity in order that we can move away from fixed characteristics and given attributes that limit the possibilities of change and social reorganisation. Using film, dialogue and talks, we will explore how the boy's experience of emotional and physical neglect leads to shame and grief which cannot be expressed in a culture dominated by the perceived need for apparently strong males.

Polyvagal Theory, Oxytocin and the Neurobiology of Love and Trust: The Therapeutic Use of the Body's Social Engagement System to Promote Feelings of Safety, Connectedness, Intimacy and Recovery
Saturday 8 June 2019 - London
A workshop with Professor Stephen Porges and Professor Sue Carter

In this workshop Porges and Carter will demonstrate the clinical applications of their research into Polyvagal Theory and oxytocin and social behavior. Their scientifically validated advancements in neuroscience offer a new way of considering brain-body medicine. Safety is critical in enabling humans to optimize their potential. The neurophysiological processes associated with feeling safe are a prerequisite not only for optimal mental health and social behavior but are also relevant in the clinical setting.

The Traumatised Mother's Inner World:
Implications for the Child's Development

Saturday 15 June 2019 - London
With speakers Dr Gwen Adshead and Dr Amanda Jones

An astonishing 13 British men each day take their own lives, and 90 per cent of all violent crimes are perpetrated by men. How can we make sense of these statistics and what do they mean for our society? Men and women are realising there is a problem with masculinity. This conference will address how we can expand our psychological understanding of masculinity in order that we can move away from fixed characteristics and given attributes that limit the possibilities of change and social reorganisation. Using film, dialogue and talks, we will explore how the boy's experience of emotional and physical neglect leads to shame and grief which cannot be expressed in a culture dominated by the perceived need for apparently strong males.

Queering Psychotherapy
Saturday 22 June 2019 - London
With speakers Dr Meg-John Barker, Leah Davidson, Dominic Davies, Pamela Gawler-Wright, Amanda Middleton, Monty Moncrieff, David Richards, Laurie Slade, George Taxidis and Judy Yellin

This unique conference will explore the advances made in improving the mental health of gender, sexuality and relationship diverse (GSRD) people in the UK. We have enlisted some of the key figures in British LGBTQ+ psychotherapy to share significant developments in the fields of analytic, systemic, person-centred and contemporary psychotherapy, as well as hearing from two British pioneers Dominic Davies, Founder of Pink Therapy and Dr Meg-John Barker, psychologist-activist and author of many books on gender and sexuality.

A Couple State of Mind: Insights into Couple Relating and Therapeutic Work with Couples
Saturday 29 June 2019 - London
With speakers Mary Morgan and Stanley Ruszczynski

This conference, inspired by our speaker Mary Morgan's new book A Couple State of Mind (Routledge, 2019) for psychotherapists who are looking for further insight into couple relating and concepts for working with couple relationships. Understanding what the couple creates together as their own developmental journey will be richly examined by Mary Morgan, drawing on psychoanalytic concepts such as shared unconscious phantasy, projective systems and narcissistic relating.

The Voiceless and Unheard
Understanding Primitive Bodily Communications in Psychotherapy

Saturday 6 July 2019 - London
With speakers Gabrielle Brown, Raffaella Hilty, Professor Brett Kahr, Dr Valerie Sinason and David O'Driscoll

Every psychotherapist practitioner will know only too well what it means to experience the rage and hatred of one's most vulnerable clients and the challenges that this raises in countertransference work. Most often these clients will express their hateful feelings verbally. But, what about those clients who cannot talk? Or those clients who are capable of talking but carry a complex range of unprocessed embodied feelings that cannot be verbally expressed?

The Need to Forget: The Capacity to Remember
Saturday 13 July 2019 - London
With speakers Richard Curen, Dr Ronald Doctor and Katya Orrell

At this seminar we will consider two possible relationships to past traumatic events: remembering, and working-through on the one hand; repressing, disavowal and acting-out on the other, and how the tension between these can be skilfully managed in the therapy relationship. Memories are core to our accumulating experience of life, providing a sense of an ongoing self and meaningful continuity. They can make us feel comfortable with the familiar, and securely connected to the past, while providing a framework for the future; it is our collection of conscious and unconscious memories that, in part, makes us who we are. But what is the experience of a client/patient, who by repressing, splitting off or disavowing past events which are too painful to bring into consciousness?

The Future in the Consulting Room: Thinking and Working Prospectively in an Uncertain World
Saturday 27 July 2019 - Dublin
With speakers Dr Galit Atlas, Dr Susie Orbach and Professor Andrew Samuels

In this conference, our speakers will explore the challenging proposition that holding our future selves in mind needs to be considered a central aspect of the psychotherapeutic dialogue - one in which patient and therapist experiment with, dramatise and dream-up the patient's future, visualising possible new and adaptive self-states. Fresh nuances in the therapeutic relationship may be needed, ones in which greater attention is paid to imagining the full range of our potential multiple selves and their equally multiple social contexts. In our era of exceptional social fluidity, when we cannot grasp the ways in which our selves are externally moulded, such an approach seems especially important.










Book of the Month
Brett Kahr's Top Ten Psychotherapy Books - 2018
Professor Brett Kahr certainly knows something about the art of authoring books. Over the years he has written or edited twelve volumes, and has served as series editor of some fifty further titles. Earlier this year, he published New Horizons in Forensic Psychotherapy: Exploring the Work of Estela V. Welldon (Karnac Books, 2018)... More >>
Watch this
Helen Fisher: The brain in love

Why do we crave love so much, even to the point that we would die for it? To learn more about our very real, very physical need for romantic love, Helen Fisher and her research team took MRIs of people in love and people who had just been dumped... view...

Did you know?
The Latest Neuroimaging Findings in Borderline Personality Disorder

Altered function in neurotransmitter systems including the serotonin, glutamate, and GABA systems was observed in patients with BPD... read more...