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Seminars, conferences and online resources for psychotherapists
Live Events Programme

Summer 2017


Live Events



Desire in the Consulting Room
Saturday 4 November 2017 - London
With Dr Andrea Celenza, Professor Joy Schaverien and the reading of a play by Laurie Slade

This day puts sexuality back in the frame of psychoanalytic theorising with the aim of demarcating a place for pure erotic longing within psychotherapy. Using clinical histories, relational/field theories and theatre to imaginatively represent a possible scenario of love and desire between a psychotherapist and patient, our speakers will elaborate the meanings of love in the consulting room, both as transferential and real.

The Deepening of the Mind
Saturday 11 November 2017 - London
A day with Neville Symington

In early May 2017 Neville Symington gave four talks on the theme of the development of the mind. He now returns to develop this theme in four new talks. Beginning with two presentations on the psychoanalytic treatment of patients who are psychotic he will then use the clinical insight derived from these to elaborate the principles needed for the mind to deepen and grow, and will consider those factors which become obstacles to that new growth.

Listening to Transmissions between Generation
Saturday 18 November 2017 - London
With Dr Haydée Faimberg and Dr Jill Salberg

It is widely accepted that the traumas of parents, grand-parents and ancestors are deeply woven into the psychological fabric of the living, often manifesting in the form of psychological vulnerability throughout life. But this presents a particular enigma for both patient and psychotherapist alike: how can the material be known and worked with when it belongs to someone else - mother, grandmother, father, grandfather or great grandparent?

Creative Interaction between Analyst and Patient: Development of the ego and creative core of the personality in psychoanalysis
Saturday 18 November 2017 - Dublin
Led by Neville Symington

Neville Symington is a psycho-analyst who has developed a view that there is an underlying pattern of disturbance that generates all the forms of mental illness described in the psychiatric text-books. He also believes that we clinicians at the moment are largely failing to heal that deeper level of disturbance because we lack the right lens with which to see what is in need of healing. This event will be typical of his characteristic invitation to reconsider the theoretical basis of our work.

Transpersonal Narratives in Eco-Psychology
Friday 24, Saturday 25 and Sunday 26 November 2017 - Eden Project
With Sophy Banks, James Barrett, Caroline Brazier, Marion Green, Professor Jeremy Holmes, Dr Justine Huxley, Kamalamani, Paul Maiteny, Peter Owen-Jones, Mary-Jayne Rust, Toni Spencer and Nick Totton

This conference proposes that caring for the natural world of which we are an integral part is critical for our survival and our emotional well-being. Disrespecting that which nurtures us leads to deepening splits, tensions and conflicts within and beyond ourselves, which counter well-being and continue our dissociation from nurturing the planet, our home.
Illness in the Consulting Room:
Working with people who present life-threatening illness in therapy

Saturday 2 December 2017 - London
With Sue Cowan-Jenssen, Dorothy Judd and Julia Segal

The diagnosis of a life-threatening illness will fill almost any individual with terror as they face the fear of dying and the process of death. Cancer in particular arouses huge anxieties. Even though half those diagnosed with cancer in England and Wales survive their disease for ten years or more, the fear of not being one of those survivors, the adjustment of identity of shifting from a healthy person to being seriously ill, the rigours of treatment and the resulting shift in dynamics of that person's relationships - including that with their therapist - form a potentially overwhelming constellation of events that are a profound threat to the self.
Dissociative Identities
Are multiple selves the greatest therapeutic challenge?

Saturday 9 December 2017 - Dublin
With Remy Aquarone, Teresa Moorhead, Dr Valerie Sinason, Dr Adah Sachs

The capacity of the mind to create new identities as a form of self-protection when faced with trauma or exploitation in childhood is an extraordinary ability. It enables the child to preserve their core sense of self by creating an alternative personality - or many 'alter' personalities - who experience the abuse on behalf of the core personality. This splitting process appears to have the additional benefit of allowing the child to maintain crucial attachment relationships with an abusing adult upon whom s/he is dependent for survival through dis-identification with the abused child and any association with the abusing carer.
Hate, Threat and Unease in the Consulting Room
Working creatively with rupture in the therapeutic relationship

Saturday 20 January 2018 - Dublin
With Dr Noreen Giffney, Dr Ian Miller, Ann Murphy, Berna O'Brien

What do we do when our client feels hate towards us, or we feel threatened by them? The therapeutic encounter provides a landscape for all human experience to be felt and known about, including experiences of hate and anger. This conference seeks to explore the dynamics at play when these challenging encounters threaten the stability of the therapeutic relationship. There are a number of reasons why a therapy relationship might run into trouble, for example, therapeutic incompetence or the patient's unreadiness for the process.
Existential Uncertainty
A 1-day workshop facilitated by Professor Ernesto Spinelli

Saturday 3 March 2018 - Dublin
With Professor Ernesto Spinelli

Current issues such as political and economic instability, climate change, and Brexit have provoked ever-increasing levels of anxiety and confusion. In turn, these concerns serve to highlight the degree to which uncertainly permeates our lives. Among contemporary psychotherapeutic models, existential psychotherapy emphasizes the inevitability of uncertainty. Its foundational stance of relatedness makes it evident that no individual "I" can ever fully determine, with complete and final certainty, what and how the world will be; how another or others will be; or even how "I" will be at any point time.
Clinical Shame: therapeutic issues unpacked
Saturday 10 March 2018 - Dublin
With Dr Olga Cox Cameron, Elaine Martin, Dr Rosaleen McElvaney

Shame frequently reflects a deeply meaningful struggle within the self, and yet often precludes being witnessed by others, inhabiting the mind as an invisible default position in which the person feels chronically inadequate, unlovable and at fault. Though usually considered an emotion, shame is more accurately a condition of the self, which can severely restrict the individual's capacity for engagement with life, and which operates as an oppressive and accusing shadow in that person's mind.










Book of the Month
Elizabeth Wilde McCormick
Change for the Better: Personal Development Through Practical Psychotherapy: Fifth Edition
This fifth edition features up-to-date thinking and practice from Cognitive Analytic Psychotherapy and includes new content on Trauma... More >>
Watch this
Helen Fisher: The brain in love

Why do we crave love so much, even to the point that we would die for it? To learn more about our very real, very physical need for romantic love, Helen Fisher and her research team took MRIs of people in love and people who had just been dumped... view...

Did you know?
The Latest Neuroimaging Findings in Borderline Personality Disorder

Altered function in neurotransmitter systems including the serotonin, glutamate, and GABA systems was observed in patients with BPD... read more...